Time to get real.

One of the classic books on improv is Truth in Comedy by Charna Halper, Del Close, and Kim Johnson. The authors' approach is simple, comedy comes out of truth. Think about the friends you think of as funny. Is it because they tell great jokes or perform stand-up? Probably not. Most likely they are funny in every day conversation. As you hang out and just talk about the day, they seem to always have a funny twist on things. They are real and present and unguarded.

In doing improv, a performer needs to remember it's not about hitting a punch line or having the best comeback that is important, it's about being real, present, and unguarded. As Truth in Comedy puts it, its about "exposing our own personalities." This is not just true of performing, Spiritual Improvisers, it's true in every day life. How well you open yourself up to others and allow yourself to be honest and present will determine the quality of your relationships. And, the quality of your relationships will affect the quality of your life. You want to be happier? Healthier? Live longer? Then give up the desire to be in control and allow life to happen. Let it unfold and trust in your tribe.

During this time of isolation it may seem hard to find comedy in truth. It may seem hard to get the support of your tribe when you can't be with them. But even though there is a physical distance, the emotional connection is just as strong. How many people actually talk on the phone anymore? Mostly we just text. But now you have the time to call. Try Facetime or Skype. Have a Zoom meeting with your tribe and hang out. Read a funny book and talk about it online. Have a chat while you all watch Tiger King or something.

Keep laughing improvisers. You can't control the situation, so look for the gems, those moments of humor, of pathos, of love. Remember the first rule of improv, "Yes, and!" So here goes, "You are quarantined to your home for 3 weeks!" Your response is, "Yes, and..........

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